cooking turkey

With Thanksgiving  popping up in less than 48 hours, I am facing my age-old nemesis, the turkey.  I think that I’ve figured out almost every way to ruin a turkey (undercooking, overcooking, offering a burnt sacrifice, along with many other accidents).  So I’m totally keen to throw in a lasagna & call it good 🙂

But alas, I will do the traditional turkey & there’s a good chance that I’ll get it right this year – hope springs eternal.  And this is exactly my point:  hope springs eternal.  Just because I’ve had a litany of turkey traumas doesn’t mean that this year is going to be another “challenge.”  After a 1,000 failed attempts with his light bulb invention, Thomas Edison said, “I have not failed.  I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

Happy Turkey Day! 🙂

Some things I like about Jet Lag ,)

 So presently, I’m in a bit of a time warp because I went to Turkey for the weekend & came back last night.  The total trip from start to finish was less than 80 hours.  In that amount of time, I was in 3 different countries, visited 4 of the 7 churches John addressed in Revelation 2-3, learned lots of cool historical & biblical stuff, rode on 6 airplanes & spent no less than 10 hours driving to various places.  With this in mind, I’m very happy to know my name & present location 🙂

Along with the above excitement, here are some things I like about jet lag:

  • time feels less definite & concrete but more amorphous
  • in my present mindframe, I find myself leaning into God more for moment by moment help
  • coffee seems to taste better ,)
  • I have a viable excuse for not making sense ,)
  • it seems like I feel or sense God better
  • my family relationships feel very gentle, tender & rich

Some thoughts from Turkey

This nation has a really rich & deep history. In the 20th century, there was alot of conflict w the Greeks & several other nations who wanted to have significant influence & control over this nation. The British also had a sizable amount a influence as well. Clearly, there has also been a massive muslim influence here for many centuries.
Prior to the 8th & 9th centuries, Turkey had a large amount of Christian presence. Some places from the Bible times that are in modern day Turkey include: Antioch, Paul’s 1st missionary journey & half of his 2nd journey, Colossae (Colossians), Ephesus & other places as well. Our guide was telling us that the modern day Turkish people have their roots from Central Asia & they migrated due to a drought & famine. The word “Turk” means nomad.

Geographically, the western part of Turkey tends to be more wealthy than in the eastern part (where the recent earthquake was last week). In the west, the land is extremely fertile & you can see farms & agricultural efforts year round. The eastern part of Turkey is where many Kurds live, who were also really ostracized by Sadaam Hussein.

Turkey is a fascinating blend of many different influences including Judaism, Christian, Central Asia, Muslim & others.

It s most certainly a tremendous privilege to get to visit this nation & I’m going to try & attach some pix to give some perspective & insights on this cool country 🙂

The attached pictures are from Laodicea from: the oldest known cathedral or basilica from 320ad in Laodicea. This city was a center of banking & gov’t for the region, trading soft black wool & a healing eye salve. Laodicea was a wealthy city. With these things in mind, pls consider reading Revelation 3:14ff 🙂

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Hello from Turkey!

I’ve popped over to Turkey for a few days so I thought I’d write a quick hello 🙂
Here’s some things that I really love about this country:
*the people are totally cool – theyre friendly, respectful, intelligent & fun!
*the history – on this brief trip I get to visit Philadelphia, Sardis, Smyrna & Laodicea, some of the churches John addressed in Revelation 2-3; furthermore, Paul’s 1st missionary trip was all over modern Turkey. Suffice it to say that his nation has a rich & magnificent history
*scenery – very beautiful: rolling hills, agrarian, some mountains & some beautiful ancient ruins.
*food – this one isn’t fair because I basically enjoy the food wherever I go, generally ,)

So be prepared for some pix tomorrow from some ofthe cool places we get to visit & please be sure to pray for the Turks on the eastern part of Turkey who are endeavoring to recover from a nasty earthquake earlier this week!

holy cow!

Its been way too long since my last blog!  Recently, we were in the mountains w the fam doing some skiing & the place where we were staying didn’t have internet access – no it wasn’t a log cabin w no running water.  Its good to be back!!  We’ve spent the last 2 weeks w lots of fam activities:

  • took the kids skiing a few times – they can now all handle easy blue runs & here are their skiing profiles (reflects their personalities):  Isabell – Reece says she cruises along;  David – stays close to me & trying his skis out on jumps (I lead because its easier to go fast when you snowboard);  Benji – just fast & more fast.
  • cooking Christmas turkey – it was ok
  • having my friend Laura & her fam stay w us & doing some skiing together
  • I read “Into Thin Air” – true story about the very deadly 1996 Mt Everest expedition w various teams

Of course I’ve been thinking about some things w God & while I don’t have answers to many questions, I have a sense of His presence w me.  So, I hope your holiday season has left you well basted & ready to move into 2009.  May this year be filled w God’s presence in your life more than 2008, in whatever way He choses & may we rest at peace in His choices for us.